By engaging with communities and people from different national cultures, UNE researchers constantly challenge our values and beliefs, our own cultural norms, to find common understandings and discover new ways of adapting to our changing environments.

Professor Heiko Daniel, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research)


UNE’s latest research stories

  • A misty road lined with deciduous trees in winter.
    A Beautiful Thing
    The dumbing down of Aboriginal achievements by the coloniser had made Aboriginal people look to be stone-aged, and without understanding, when in fact we knew more about our country and star systems than any academics ever could. Victor Briggs Victor Briggs, a Gumbayngirr/Gamilaroi man born in Gamilaroi country, finished his 2018 Masters of Philosophy at…
  • Old leather-bound bible on weathered wooden boards.
    Exploring the journey of a Birrpai Goori woman
    ... and her convict husband John Heath John Heath is a Birrpai man from the area now called Port Macquarie. John is descended from Charlotte Bugg, a Birrpai woman who married James Bugg, an English convict, transported and placed as assigned labour with the Australian Agricultural Company (AA Co.) in 1827. The company had received…
  • Old wooden window on a weatherboard building, with paint peeling off.
    Looking Through Windows
    These stories are real, they did happen, and they provide the deep knowledge and history of what is now called Australia. Lorina Barker The Back to Brewarrina & The Old Mission Elders Gathering was a major component of Looking Through Windows, a research project about the removal, dispossession and ‘protection’ of Aboriginal Peoples in NSW.…
  • A sunset, red sky reflecting on the water with for the foreground and bush background in dark silhouette.
    Resistance and Reprisal
    The pervading terror of Lieutenant Cobban's 1938 New England Expedition The violent exploits of government-sanctioned operatives like Cobban were evidently exempt from prosecution.” Callum Clayton-Dixon Any idea that the colonization of Australia was conducted largely peacefully is being challenged by a generation of Aboriginal researchers, among them Callum Clayton-Dixon, an Ambēyaŋ researcher working at UNE.…
  • Old reel-to-reel film projector
    Australia’s First Peoples and Ethnographic Film-making
    For Aboriginal peoples now, however, the films made by anthropologic and ethnographic film-makers have a problematic value. Issues now arise about how to manage this material, who owns it and can give permission for it to be used, or stop it from being used, and to whom the material can be made available. Michael Brogan…
  • Indigenous fishing net with museum tag.
    Stolen Weaving
    Interview with Amy Hammond White people say that we have no culture, but then, they have our stuff locked away in museums and private collections all over the world. Amy Hammond is a Gamilaroi mother and community member, working to reclaim Gamilaroi weaving knowledge and to pass these stories and cultural practices on to the…

Graduate research — latest story

  • A sunset, red sky reflecting on the water with for the foreground and bush background in dark silhouette.
    Resistance and Reprisal
    The pervading terror of Lieutenant Cobban's 1938 New England Expedition The violent exploits of government-sanctioned operatives like Cobban were evidently exempt from prosecution.” Callum Clayton-Dixon Any idea that the colonization of Australia was conducted largely peacefully is being challenged by a generation of Aboriginal researchers, among them Callum Clayton-Dixon, an Ambēyaŋ researcher working at UNE.…
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