The subjects of this range of research pursuits confirmed the focus of this edition of Research+; We need to be awed by the beauty and wonder of the world in order to care for it, protect it and nurture it. I hope this edition goes some way to inspiring you to share this wonder.

Dr Fiona Utley, Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research)


UNE’s latest research stories

  • A bright yellow Goby Fish in the ocean with a coral reef.
    Little fish, big roles: cryptic fishes on coral reefs
    They've been called the Tim Tams of the reef ... but I don't agree with all that. Dr Chris Goatley Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Environmental and Rural Science. While most of us are aware that coral reefs abound with life, many may not realise that most reefs exist in “marine deserts”. Recent work by…
  • A pygmy possum curled up into a ball, on a dark blue background.
    Pygmy-possums — on the brink of extinction?
    The species was long considered to be exthinct and was only known from fossil jawbones found at Wombeyan Caves in NSW. However, it was re-discovered in 1966, about 70 years after its first description from fossil material, in a ski hut on Mount Higginbotham, Victoria. Professor Fritz Geiser Madgwick Distinguished Professor of Zoology, School of…
  • Presumed Extinct: the desert-rat-kangaroo
    Not all species presumed to be extinct are gone forever — there are remarkable Lazarus-like tales of rediscovery, and many of these come from our own continent. Associate Professor Karl Vernes School of Environmental and Rural Science. How many species are there currently alive on Earth today? If you don’t know the answer, that’s OK…
  • The Hidden World of Parasites: unseen stagehands in the theatre of life
    The base of this barnacle has been transformed into a network of roots which extend deep into the shark’s body. Dr Tommy Leung School of Environmental and Rural Science. To most people the word “parasite” evokes disgust and contempt, and is often used as a term of insult. Beyond that, parasitic organisms themselves are what…
  • Wild Pollinators
    Some flower visitors would never enter your mind as being potential pollinators. Dr Romina Rader Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research (DECRA) Fellow School of Environmental and Rural Science. The animal kingdom is a diverse place, with many different orders of weird and wonderful animals. Australia is well known for its fair share of…
  • Do you know your neighbourhood?
    Raptors, or birds of prey, and owls, are important indicators of environmental health. Dr Stephen Debus School of Environmental and Rural Science. Raptors, or birds of prey, and owls, are important indicators of environmental health because they are at the top of the food chain. Their population trends can signal ecosystem stability (or dysfunction), and…

Graduate research — latest stories

  • Gone to the dogs
    It became very clear to Brooke that you cannot improve animal management without consulting with, and building the capacity of the local people, and this means taking the time to sit and listen.” Brooke Kennedy Doctoral candidate School of Environmental and Rural Science. Brooke Kennedy, an Indigenous PhD researcher in the School of Environmental and…
  • Bells Turtle on a rock near a river.
    Old souls
    For 250 million years, the turtle’s armour was sufficient to protect them from nearly any threat. Now, many need our help to survive.” Geoff Hughes Doctoral candidate School of Environmental and Rural Science. All over the world, turtles hold a special place in human culture. To some Aboriginal Australians, turtles represent love and compassion, and…
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