The Black Pages

Aboriginal Employment and Community Information
The Black Pages

Our Deepest Fear

Yaama Bloggers,

I learned from an early age that the lie of ‘shame’ had been taught to Aboriginal people; we were made to believe that we could not shine and were made to believe that we could not speak out…. Yet from the days of Pemulwuy to the days Mr William Ferguson, Mr Jack Patten of the 1938 Day of Mourning, Aboriginal peoples have stood up to be noticed. And now in the 40th year of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy we must remember to shine, remember to hold high our heads so that others will follow, and teach our children that shame is a thing of the past… 

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us.’ We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There’s nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It’s not just in some of us; it’s in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we’re liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others ….. Marianne Williamson  

Remember to take care of yourselves, each other and your community

Rob

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